Category Archives: UK vs French Parliament 2012

Differing Interpretations of Expatriate Democracy in France and UK

We are grateful for the supporting article below in the April, 2013 edition of  The Connexion, English language newspaper in France. Through interviews with French MPs representing French expatriates, the article compares and contrasts the differing interpretations of democracy in France and the UK … Continue reading

Posted in Electoral Commission, Expat Democracy: France vs UK, French Expat Voters, French Inspire 1 million Overseas Voters, French Internet Voting, French Overseas Voting Statistics, Lord Lexden: All-Party Inquiry, Lord Lexden: Reasons to Remove 15 yr Limit, UK vs French Parliament 2012, Voting Rights | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

IER for Overseas Voters

One reason why registration rates for overseas voters are so low is illustrated by research below into Individual Electoral Registration (IER). A change to IER from their former and compulsary Householder Electoral Registration (HER), is already required of British citizens moving  abroad to … Continue reading

Posted in Electoral Commission, Expat Voter Registration, Global British Representation, Harry Shindler's Human Right to Vote, IER for Overseas Voters., Lack of Government respect, Older Generation More Impacted, Representation encourages overseas voters, UK vs French Parliament 2012, Voting Rights, Younger Generation Voters | 2 Comments

UK vs French Parliament 2012

454,901 expatriate French have voted  worldwide for their President and soon for deputies to their Assembly in Paris  – <see left << The red is where François Hollande was supported (46.93%). Blue – Sarkozy (53.05%) And if this had been … Continue reading

Posted in Electoral Commission, Expat pensioners' rights, French Expat Voters, French Internet Voting, French Overseas Voting Statistics, Global British Representation, Harry Shindler, Harry Shindler's Human Right to Vote, Military Covenant, Neglected overseas voters, UK vs French Parliament 2012, Voting Rights | Leave a comment